Borneo Surf Shop

a spontaneous journal of the works of others
purely for the sake of inspiration
workman:

an-art-gallery:
Number 5, 1948
Jackson Pollock
Jackson Pollock’s paintings are no strangers to high prices at auction, and his Number 5 is no different. In November of 2006, Number 5, painted in Pollock’s unique drip technique, was sold for $140 million dollars, the highest price ever paid at auction for a painting, to an unknown buyer. This price exceeded both the high price paid for his Blue Poles, which sold in 1973, as well as Gustav Klimt’s Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I, which previously held the high price record. Using his entire body to paint in a method called “action painting,” Pollock dripped and splattered layer upon layer of paint to create his chaotic patterns.

workman:

an-art-gallery:

Number 5, 1948

Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock’s paintings are no strangers to high prices at auction, and his Number 5 is no different. In November of 2006, Number 5, painted in Pollock’s unique drip technique, was sold for $140 million dollars, the highest price ever paid at auction for a painting, to an unknown buyer. This price exceeded both the high price paid for his Blue Poles, which sold in 1973, as well as Gustav Klimt’s Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I, which previously held the high price record. Using his entire body to paint in a method called “action painting,” Pollock dripped and splattered layer upon layer of paint to create his chaotic patterns.

workman:

mordmardok:
THE REAL HAIR OF A REAL GEISHA — A Raven-Haired Rapunzel of Japan Shows What Happens When You Wash Out the Famous Geisha Hair-do ! (di Okinawa Soba)

workman:

mordmardok:

THE REAL HAIR OF A REAL GEISHA — A Raven-Haired Rapunzel of Japan Shows What Happens When You Wash Out the Famous Geisha Hair-do ! (di Okinawa Soba)

workman:

sci-universe:

This is a quadruple Saturn moon transit snapped by Hubble in 2009.

The giant orange moon Titan — larger than the planet Mercury — can be seen at upper right. The white icy moons that are much closer to Saturn, hence much closer to the ring plane in this view, are, from left to right: Enceladus, Dione, and Mimas.

(Credit: NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team)